3 Powerful Books about resistance training for strength and fitness

This is a short list of strength training resources to help you earn real, lasting results for your body

(don’t be like this guy)

Drop the magazines

Drop the magazines

Benefits of resources for strength training:

  • More understanding of the human body and especially the muscular system
  • Principles of form and technique to enhance gains and help you prevent injuries
  • An emphasis on gaining real, functional strength as opposed to bulky muscle

Knowledge is power so check out these training resources…

1. Strength Training Anatomy, 3rd Edition, Frederic Delavier

Engage the muscles fully. This information will help you understand how to both target and balance your muscle groups. This is one of the first strength books to read as the illustrations and pictures really help you make sense of the exercises. A very useful resource.

2. Starting Strength, 3rd Edition (Barbell training)

Mark Rippetoe puts a lot of energy into his coaching. He advocates the top 3 movements: Squat, deadlift, and press. The idea is that when you gain strength in squat, deadlift, and presses, then you will have strength that carries over to everything! This book supports the ‘hips go back’ approach for lower body training and emphasizes the importance of hip drive for power.

3. Strong Curves: A Woman’s Guide to Building a Better Butt and Body, Bret Contreras

For strength and conditioning from a hip perspective, Bret Contreras is looked to by many as an expert. As a researcher, he’s plugged electrodes onto all different areas of the body to gain scientific knowledge of which exercises activate certain muscles more than others. Then, as a coach, he’s taken that information and helped many people (especially women) gain strength in the glutes and overall body. A fantastic must-have resource for female lifters (and those who train them).

Stay tuned…

I’ll write more about how to design a workout, the principles of resistance training, and how the benefits of being on a program (in addition to other reader requests).

Read, run. Gain.

Read, run. Gain.

Thanks for reading…

 

 

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